Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Diana Ross "It's My House"

I hope you realize that C.I.'s doing 19 number one hits (pop charts) each day at THE COMMON ILLS to note the 19 number ones Diana Ross sang on ("We Are The World" -- she's a soloist, it should be counted but many wrongly say 18 hits). 

In addition, C.I.'s noting any other songs Diana had that went number one on another chart but didn't go number one on the US pop charts -- that's 11 more number ones.

"It's My House" was a US dance number one but that year if you had more than one single on the chart they clomped them all together.

So "It's My House" is a number one with "No One Gets The Prize" and "The Boss."  All three get a number one chart position -- they share it.  Me?  I'd count it as three number ones but take it up with BILLBOARD.

Since Diana has 19 US number one pop hits, C.I. started noting one each in the lead up to November 19th when THE AMERICAN MUSIC AWARDS are live on ABC and Diana performs and receives the lifetime achievement award.

If you read this site, you know I love Diana!!!

I feel badly that I haven't done more to note Diana's big award.  :(



That's Diana's "It's My House" -- the original mix.

"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Wednesday, November 15, 2017.  The Iraq War continues, where's THE NATION magazine?  Iraqi girls are yet again under attack from the politicians who are supposed to be representing them.  And much more.








"Touch Me In The Morning" is one of the 19 number one pop songs (BILLBOARD US singles chart) that Diana Ross has sang on.  November 19th, she'll be on the live broadcast (ABC) of The American Music Awards to perform and to receive the American Music Award for Lifetime Achievement.  Motown Classic is issuing DIAMOND DIANA: THE LEGACY COLLECTION November 17th to note this monumental achievement.


And Diana's daughter Tracee Ellis Ross (BLACKISH) will be hosting this year's American Music Awards.



I couldn't miss the honoring my mom this Sunday... so I'm hosting the show! Don't miss it this Sunday at 8/7c on ABC!
 
 


Switching topics, let's note things that don't make sense if you are capable of thought.

If you want to know how Hypocritical the GOP is, consider the fact that there were more investigations into Benghazi than the false intelligence which rationalized the Iraq war, killing 300,000+ People.



This nonsense has been going on forever.

I have no idea why .


This does not reflect poorly on House Republicans (where the bulk of the inquiries took place).

House Republicans -- like Senate Republicans -- voted for the Iraq War and supported it.

In the 2006 mid-terms, promising to end the Iraq War, the Democrats won back both houses of Congress.

From January 2007 through January 2011, Democrats controlled both houses of Congress.

Brian Krassenstein thinks he's saying something amazing.

He's not.

The Iraq War is the biggest blunder/crime/mistake/error/take your pick of the 21st century.

And Democrats campaigned on ending it.

But when in charge of both houses, they didn't do what the promised and they didn't investigate the lies of the Iraq War -- lies that started before the illegal war began and lies that continued after the war started.

So the GOP's not the one looking bad there, it's the craven Democratic leadership in Congress that refused to do (a) what they promised and (b) what the Constitution required them to do.

The ongoing Iraq War will hit the 15 year mark in March.

Has it achieved anything of note?

Is Iraq any safer?


Countries that suffered the greatest impact from terrorism in the 2017 Global Terrorism Index: 1. Iraq 2. Afghanistan 3. Nigeria 4. Syria 5. Pakistan 6. Yemen 7. Somalia 8. India 9. Turkey 10. Libya Read more in the full report:
 
 



14 years and counting and nothing to show for it.

Every so-called "turned corner" leads right back to where they stood before.

Hayder al-Abadi's 'big' difference between thug Nouri al-Maliki?

His personal favorite to persecute is the Kurds and not the Sunnis.

Otherwise, it's the same situation all over again.

He's imprisoning reporters, he's attacking political opponents, he's committing War Crimes.

In fact, he might soon be judged worse than Nouri al-Maliki because it was Hayder who brought the militias into the armed forces despite the Constitutional ban on the militias.

In spite of that ban.

The damage these War Criminals have already done is immense but the effects will be felt for years to come.

That's why Hayder stands a good chance of surpassing Nouri when it comes to thuggish War Criminals.




At the start of 2005, the magazine offered "Iraq's Lost Election" -- an editorial which included:


As long as the occupation continues, any Iraqi government or constitution will be tainted and incapable of producing the compromises necessary for a stable and unified Iraq. Therefore, for the sake of Iraq's future and the safety of our young men and women, the United States must begin an orderly withdrawal, coordinated with stepped-up US and international economic assistance. We recognize that further violence and internal fighting among Iraqis may follow, but to believe that a continuing US military presence can prevent this is naïve or disingenuous; it will, rather, contribute to the instability. The best long-term outcome is for Iraqis to regain control of their own country and sort out their own future. 


As we asked at THIRD this week, "What's changed?"


Well, about the only change I'm seeing is that THE NATION no longer makes this argument and lost interest in Iraq in 2009.





Thought I was over the bridge now
Over the bridge now
I'm already in
Circles and circles and circles again, the girls
Circles and circles, got to stop spinning
Circles and circles and circles again, the girls
Circles and circles and circles again, well
Circles and circles, circles again, the girls
Circles and circles, got to stop spinning
Circles and circles and circles again, the girls
Circles and circles and circles again, well

-- "Cloud On My Tongue," written by Tori Amos, first appears on her album UNDER THE PINK (live version from her album TO VENUS AND BACK).


Circles and circles and circles again . . .

The US keeps imposing prime ministers on Iraq and then keeping US troops in the country to prop up their puppet.

Nothing's changed.

Elections are supposed to take place in May.

Why?

In 2010, the Iraqi people voted Nouri out but Barack Obama overruled them and nullified their votes via the US-brokered Erbil Agreement.



C. Alexander Ohlers (THE HILL) offers:

 
Another positive development was the emergence of a non-sectarian Sunni-Shiite coalition, the Iraqi National Movement (al Iraqiya), which would win a narrow majority in the 2010 election against Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki’s State of Law Collation.
 
Although the victors normally have the first opportunity to form a collation government, Maliki influenced the Iraq courts to sanction his party with a prevenient opportunity to form a government. A nine-month standoff ensued as a result, during which time Maliki retained power while Iran pressured wayward Shiite groups to join Maliki’s coalition.
 
The U.S. Administration was faced with a decision: to reinforce Iraq’s democratic process; or, to support the Maliki government. As reported by Ned Parker in Foreign Affairs and Politico, Vice President Biden and then Ambassador Hill chose to back the politically stronger Maliki as prime minister through a compromise power sharing arrangement, or the Erbil Agreement.
 
The outcome was dire. After U.S. troops departed from Iraq at the end of 2011, Maliki reneged on the terms of the Erbil Agreement. Instead, he moved to centralized power, exiled several Sunni leaders, and marginalized Sunni groups in what many analysts believe set fertile soil for the rise of ISIS.


Then, tired of Nouri in the summer of 2014, Barack installed Hayder -- a loser no one had heard of before.

Circles and circles?  Yet again, there's a bill in Iraq that, if passed, would lower the age of marriage for girls (not boys) to nine-years.  If you missed this a few years back, you can refer to the April 17, 2014 snapshot.

This month, the bill was again proposed -- see the November 3rd  snapshot.  Last week,  Mustafa Habib (NIQASH) reported:


“There are serious constitutional and legal violations in this desire of the Islamic parties to amend the law,” one Iraqi MP, Shuruq al-Abaji, told NIQASH.
She points out that Article 41 of the Iraqi Constitution guarantees that Iraqis are free to choose personal status according to their religious beliefs, sects or other choices. Before the amendments can be made to the personal status law, this article would need to be changed, al-Abaji insists.
And there is another legal issue, the politician notes. The proposed new personal status law would refer issues of marriage, divorce, custody and inheritance to the religious endowment authorities – these are the bodies tasked with running and maintaining Shiite or Sunni mosques and shrines and they are very important institutions within their own sectarian communities. But, as al-Abaji argues, that violates not just the principle of the separation of powers but also human rights and international laws around women’s rights.
“The organization of these issues should be the responsibility of the courts and not the executive branch of Sunni or Shiite religious orders,” al-Abaji concludes.
Iraq’s original personal status law and the proposed amendments could not be more different. The first one grants mothers the right to custody and gives wives the right to inherit their husband’s estate. Meanwhile religious jurisprudence tends to say the custody of children is a matter for the father and that women do not have the right to inherit real estate or land.
However these were not even the issues that really riled Iraqis up. The change that most angered locals was the one related to legal marriageable age. Civil law says a couple should be aged at least 18 in order to marry. Meanwhile religious law says puberty means a female is of marriageable age. In some cases, this is considered to be nine years old, in others 12 years old. 
“The newly proposed law encourages the marriage of minors and reminds us most of the way that the [extremist group] Islamic State behaved with young girls, how the organisation forced them to marry group members when they were in control in Mosul and Raqqa,” says MP Rizan al-Sheik Daleer.
Once again, civil society and women’s rights organisations rallied around to protests the changes in the law. Many Iraqis on social media used the hashtag #NoToUnderageMarriages and a number of Facebook pages were created to organize the protests and garner support.




Chris Harris (EURONEWS) has reported on the issue:


Iraq has moved a step closer to allowing girls as young as nine to marry, human rights campaigners have claimed.
The proposal is part of a draft law recently approved by 40 MPs that would see the restoration of religious courts, says Equality Now (EN).
Government courts have, since 1959, ruled on such matters, setting the official age of marriage to 18, although a judge can allow it at 15.
But the proposed legislation – which will have to be approved by a full parliament to go ahead – would instead see religious courts decide.
“The nine-year-old thing comes from the different interpretations of the wife of the Prophet Muhammad,” said Suad Abu-Dayyeh, EN’s Middle East consultant.
“Some interpretations say she was married at the age of nine. That is why some religious sects in Iraq are following that.”
UNICEF says one-in-five girls are married as children in Iraq and that the practice often sees them abandon education and fall pregnant. If the mother is under 18 when she gives birth her infant’s risk of dying in the first year is 60% higher. Underage marriage also puts the girl at greater vulnerability to domestic violence, the NGO says.
“Iraqi women are outraged,” Abu-Dayyeh told Euronews. “We’re very concerned and it will affect all women’s issues in their daily lives.
“I think we will see an explosion of child marriage in Iraq if it’s passed. It’s not logical, we’re in 2017 and we’re still going backwards in terms of women’s rights.” 


Karen McVeigh (GUARDIAN) noted yesterday:

Public demonstrations were held last weekend by civil society and women’s rights groups against the amendment. The United Nations in Iraq (Unami) called for wider consultations and for women’s rights to be fully recognised and protected. 
An earlier, more extreme version of the bill, provoked an international outcry when it was proposed, ahead of the elections in 2014. The earlier version also restricted women’s rights in terms of divorce, parenting and inheritance.
Opposition to the current proposals, which were approved this month, has so far concentrated on their impact on child marriage.
Suad Abu-Dayyeh, of Equality Now, based in Jordan, told the Guardian: “This bill contradicts international conventions and the national law in Iraq. If it is approved, in effect, each and every religious sect will follow their clerics. It will be catastrophic for women’s rights.

“We are outraged, and we will be supporting women in Iraq by issuing alerts about the bill. We are also writing letters to the speaker of [parliament] and the president.”


Circles and circles . . .

Meanwhile, Sunday's earthquake on the Iraq-Iran border continues to receive attention -- it is the deadliest earthquake of this year so far.

The Iraqi constitution refers to the region hit by the as "Kurdistan Region". The Iranian constitution refers to it as "Kordestan", "Kermanshah" and "Ilam". Using non-official terms such as "Northern Iraq" and "Western Iran" is politicizing a humanitarian catastrophe.
 
 


Among those offering sympathy?  Enrique Iglesias.



Everyone please send your love, thoughts and prayers to those suffering from the earthquake in Iran & Iraq….
 
 



Among those still failing to offer leadership?  Hayder al-Abadi.



The following community sites -- plus Jody Watley -- updated:



















Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Truth

As I noted last week, I believe Juanita Broaddrick


S.E. Cupp (NEW YORK DAILY NEWS) notes:





That it has taken liberals almost 30 years to begin to question whether Clinton's behavior in the 1990s warrants additional scrutiny is both disturbing and unsurprising. Disturbing, because his accusers were in many cases credible, yet were subjected to vicious smear campaigns by Clinton supporters and the Clintons themselves. Unsurprising, because for the past three decades, Democrats have been trying to elect or re-elect a Clinton to office, and so covering up or denying their numerous and obvious flaws was for many a full-time job. Now, in the safety of 2017, with no Clintons running for office — we hope — and an environment that is far less friendly to the accused, some are admitting the party may have covered for him for far too long.
It is not, however, a total about-face. Perhaps uncomfortable with just how far Democrats went to defend Bill Clinton, there's a lot of finger-pointing, hedging and couching.




[. . .]




In far more convincing Atlantic piece, Caitlin Flanagan performs no such contortions, calling out revered feminist Gloria Steinem for an unforgiveable 1998 New York Times op-ed, in which she "slut-shamed, victim-blamed, and age-shamed" and "urged compassion for and gratitude to the man the women accused." Steinem referred to Clinton's alleged crimes as mere "passes" — a term that would be unacceptable if applied today to others accused of serious harassment or rape. Steinem and other feminists' sycophantic devotion to Hillary Clinton over the years has manifest in similarly anti-woman attacks on other women. Steinem called Sarah Palin the "wrong woman" for vice president because she believed in creationism, abstinence and gun rights — which are hardly fringe or unpopular beliefs. She chided, "Palin shares nothing but a chromosome with Clinton."


Not only does Juanita deserve to be heard, Gloria Steinem needs to apologize -- immediately she needs to apologize.

"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Tuesday, November 14, 2017.




"Ain't No Mountain High Enough" is one of the 19 number one pop songs (BILLBOARD US singles chart) that Diana Ross has sang on.  November 19th, she'll be on the live broadcast (ABC) of The American Music Awards to perform and to receive the American Music Award for Lifetime Achievement.  Motown Classic is issuing DIAMOND DIANA: THE LEGACY COLLECTION November 17th to note this monumental achievement.



Iraq, meanwhile, is still dealing with the aftermath of a natural disaster.


RUDAW notes  Sunday's earthquake on the Iraq - Iran border was the deadliest earthquake of 2017 thus far. Nasser Karimi and  Mohammed Nasiri (AP) report:

Rescuers on Tuesday used backhoes and heavy equipment to dig through the debris of buildings toppled by a powerful earthquake on the border between Iran and Iraq that killed over 530 people, with weeping women crying out to God as aid workers found new bodies.
The grim work began in earnest again at dawn in the Kurdish town of Sarpol-e-Zahab in the western Iranian province of Kermanshah, which appears to be the hardest hit in the magnitude 7.3 earthquake.





More than 400 people were killed and almost 6,500 others injured after a 7.3-magnitude earthquake struck near Iran's border with Iraq. See more:



One of the deadliest earthquakes struck the border and has killed more than 450 people, my prayers and my thoughts are with the victims and their families. The world needs to come together in tough times like this to support these nations! ❤️


7.3 Earthquake: Iran-Iraq Border Earthquake is Deadliest of 2017. A Huge Rescue Effort is Under Way After A Powerful Earthquake Struck Iran's Mountainous Border With Iraq, Killing Now More Than 500 People & Injuring Over 7,000. 🙏
The media could not be played.
4 replies60 retweets60 likes








Sympathy has been noted around the world.  We'll note some of that.


Tragic news from Iran and Iraq today. Canadians offer their deepest sympathies to the families affected by the earthquake in the region.






United States expresses sincere condolences to all of those affected by the earthquake in Iran and Iraq. We keep the families of those who were killed, and injured, in our thoughts as well as the communities that have suffered damage.




China is willing to offer necessary assistance to Iran, Iraq over the earthquake in light of their needs, said Chinese foreign ministry on Tuesday




Turkey stands ready to provide search and rescue teams & send humanitarian aid for earthquake victims in . Our thoughts and prayers are with our Iraqi brothers and sisters.


My thoughts are with Iranian and Iraqi Canadians today who have lost loved ones or are waiting for word about their loved ones after Sunday's earthquake.






But not everyone has expressed sympathy or acknowledged what has taken place.


Iraqi "National" Team played in Karbala last night, failed to spare few seconds to pay respect to the victims of the earthquake that hit the Kurdish region of their country. -- Are the Kurds really considered Iraqi citizens or we just have an imposed Iraqi "national" ID?







That was rude.

And considering the current realities in Iraq today include the persecution of the Kurds, it was also very unhelpful.


Hayder al-Abadi doesn't have a brain -- he's a member of Dawa and State of Law after all.


 A smart leader would foster a national identity.

Hayder's not smart.

And he sees that persecuting a journalist who reported what he didn't like or preventing medicine from getting into the Kurdistan region doesn't result in the world condemning him.

He sees it and, like thug Nouri al-Maliki before him, he thinks he can get away with even more.


For those who have forgotten, the coddling of Nouri, the looking away from his crimes as prime minister, his persecution of various groups in Iraq, all of that came together to set the stage for the rise of ISIS in Iraq.

What's coming next?

ISIS was far worse than al Qaeda in Iraq.

Chances are what comes next will be worse than ISIS.

The only way to fix this mess -- mess fostered by the US government?

Then-President Barack Obama rightly noted on June 19, 2014 that the only answer was a political solution.

At what point do efforts take place to achieve that?

Apparently the answer is: NEVER.

And we watch as a new horror is created as Hayder grasps there are no checks on him and no condemnation coming, he can do whatever he wants.


New content at THIRD:


The following community sites updated: