Thursday, August 10, 2017

The Milky Way

I found this, by Neel V. Patel, very interesting:

Sitting at the center of the Milky Way galaxy lies a supermassive black hole named Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), possessing the mass of about 4 million suns. And the primary function of Sgr A* is to be an eternal suck hole for any and all matter that manages to unwittingly find its way into the black hole’s vicinity, new data illustrates. The supermassive black hole has inadvertently become a testing ground for Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity.
Astronomers using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), among other instruments, just completed an analysis of a trove of new data regarding Sgr A*, which demonstrates gravitational effects predicted by Einstein. The new findings, published in The Astrophysical Journal, further validate the theory of relativity through the orbit of the stars circling around Sgr A*.

ZEROHEDGE.COM reports more on Loretta Lynch and her meeting with Bill Clinton and how she came up with a line to feed the press and asked the others below her to pimp it.

But I find the Milky Way so much more interesting right now.

When I was a little girl, we'd go over to my grandmothers and she's make a big palette in the front yard and we'd all be on it staring at the night sky while she pointed out various planets and stars.

Those were magical moments.

"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Thursday, August 10, 2017.

*movie preview voice* from the producers of Iraq War comes a new blood-soaked debacle, this time with *record scratch* real nuclear weapons

Eli Lake: "Leaving aside means and only looking at outcome, regime change for North Korea would be a great outcome from a humanitarian perspective."

It's as though the last fourteen years never happened or happened without Eli Lake.

Iraq had regime change.

There's been no benefit -- that's across the board but certainly when it comes to "a humanitarian perspective."

Iraq still lacks a stable government -- forget one that governs fairly.

It remains one of the most corrupt nations in the world.

Population wise, it's a young country now with a median age of 19.9 years.

It's a country of orphans in many respects due to the never-ending violence.

A country of widows and orphans.

  1. Without an income + often with children to support, Mosul’s war widows are among most vulnerable displaced in :

Areas of Iraq will produce birth defects for decades due to the weapons used there.  (Used there by foreign forces -- the US-led coalition.)

Humanitarian includes medical and the US has bombed hospitals throughout the war as has the Iraqi government.  In addition, doctors have been repeatedly targeted and threatened leading to many of them fleeing the country.

The education system is as frayed as everything else from the war.  In the next 20 years, Iraq needs to build at least 20,000 schools as a result of many things including (a) the destruction of schools from bombings and (b) 'aid' that resulted in faulty construction.

I'm failing to see any benefits "from a humanitarian perspective."

And the Iraq War was supposed to be 'quick.'

Instead, it's 14 years later and still going.

: attacks army positions in the area of Diyuub in northern , kills several soldiers & burs 4 bulldozers.

In pictures: sharpshooters sneak up on Iraqi Army checkpoints near Tal Afar

This is Iraq right now:

US-backed Iraqi troops and militias assaulting and executing starved civilians found under the rubble in Old

Confused as to how this qualifies as a 'success' "from a humanitarian perspective."

Darkest days?

What a load of nonsense.

THE WASHINGTON POST can call it the "darkest days" because it's a contractor and further removed from the US military.

Falluja in April or November of 2004.

The gang-rape and murder of Abeer by US soldiers.

The use of illegal weapons by the US-led coalition.

But Blackwater is the "darkest days"?

Far be it from THE WASHINGTON POST to ever call out the US government.

And speaking of which, shame on any US journalist writing about Blackwater today and still not telling reporters who was being protected.

Remember that?

Supposedly, a US official was being escorted by Blackwater that day.

All these years later, we can't even be told (a) if that was true and (b) if true, who it was?

The following community sites updated:


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